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LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER 3.0 D300 Vogue 4dr Auto
LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER 3.0 D300 Vogue 4dr Auto
LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER 3.0 D300 Vogue 4dr Auto
LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER 3.0 D300 Vogue 4dr Auto
LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER 3.0 D300 Vogue 4dr Auto
LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER 3.0 D300 Vogue 4dr Auto
LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER 3.0 D300 Vogue 4dr Auto

325285837 990.50 300
£8914.53 Inc VAT (9 Months Upfront) | 48 Month Contract | 5000 k Miles P/A

LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER
3.0 D300 Vogue 4dr Auto

Estate | 4 Doors | Diesel | Automatic

£990.50

Per Month Inc VAT
Initial Payment
£8914.53 (9 Months Upfront)
Contract Length: 48 Months
Annual Mileage: 5000
Document Fee: £300.00
Average Monthly Cost: £1161.83

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Price History

Rating Breakdown

Performance
7
10
Handling
7
10
Comfort
7
10
Space
7
10
Style
7
10
Build
7
10
Value
6
10
Equipment
7
10
Economy
6
10
Depreciation
7
10
Insurance
6
10
Total
67
100

Technical Specs, Equipment & Colours

Vehicle Review

So many cars claim to be unique but the Range Rover really is, continuing to set the standard in the super-luxury SUV sector. This improved MK4 model gets the option of petrol/electric Plug-in hybrid power - and offers mild hybrid diesel power for the first time. And all variants get a luxurious cabin with an intuitive 'Touch Pro Duo' infotainment system. Otherwise, things are much as they've always been with a Range Rover, this aluminium-bodied luxury SUV good enough to properly combine the imperious qualities of a top luxury saloon with off piste abilities that would be limited only by the skills of its driver. A Rolls Royce in the rough, there's nothing quite like it.

'Don't change it: just make it better'. That's what Range Rover customers have long told Land Rover, so consistent evolution of this model has long been the Solihull company's mantra when it comes to this car. With a pedigree over four distinct generations going all the way back to 1970, it's always been, without question, the 'finest 4x4xfar'. We're currently edging towards the end of the lifespan of the fourth generation version, but even at this point in this design's development, some pretty fundamental changes are being introduced - a key one being the introduction of various electrified engines: we'll be discussing those in this review. This MK4 model adopted a lightweight aluminium body structure to make itself faster and more responsive at the same time as being more efficient and cheaper to run. As ever, this car offers a properly limousine-like rear cabin and performance approaching that of a super-saloon. And yes, if you need it to be, it's well capable of allowing you to set off across the Serengeti or explore the Amazon. It is, more than ever, one of a kind.

Did we ever imagine we'd see a Range Rover with a four cylinder engine? Probably not but the sophisticated aluminium underpinnings of this fourth generation design have made that possible. The four cylinder powerplant in question is the 2.0-litre petrol/electric hybrid unit used in the Plug-in P400e version, but we'll get to that shortly because most customers are going to want something more conventional beneath the bonnet. Key recent changes beneath the bonnet see the old V6 and V8 diesels replaced by a new in-line six cylinder MHEV 48V mild hybrid diesel, offered in D300 (300PS) and D350 (350PS) forms. This, the brand claims, delivers the efficiency of a V6 with the performance of a V8. The few who'd consider a conventional petrol-powered Range Rover are offered a straight-six P400 variant with 400hp and mild hybrid technology. And, as before , there's the 5.0-litre supercharged V8, available either with 525bhp (in the 'P525' variants) - or 565bhp in top 'SVAutobiography Dynamic' 'P565' guise. As for that Plug-in hybrid, well it's badged 'P400e PHEV' and develops 404hp; enough grunt to get you to 60mph in 6.4s en route to 137mph. Off road, things are much as before; supremely capable in other words. There's an 'Intelligent Terrain Response 2' system with up to seven driving modes. Which works with a full time 'intelligent 4WD system' with a two-speed transfer 'box (that you can shift down into on the move at up to 37mph), plus Land Rover's very clever All-Terrain Progress Control system. Here, the driver can input a desired speed without any pedal inputs. The ATPC set-up will then maintain that, reducing the driver's workload and keeping the car's composure over steep gradients, rough terrain and low-grip surfaces.

There are no exterior changes to this updated model but it remains an elegant thing, the classy panelwork draped around a lightweight all-aluminium monocoque body structure. Inside though, quite a lot has changed. As before, there's an optional long wheelbase bodystyle if you feel the interior of the standard short wheelbase model to be insufficiently spacious for your needs. Either way, the cabin now features wider, softer seats that at the back, free up an additional 186mm of legroom. Rear seat folk can also specify a massaging system and can make use of up to 17 media connection points. If you need even more rear space, then as before, there's also a LWB version of this car offering an extra 200mm in length, all of which goes for the benefit of rear seat folk. Up front, the key interior change with his revised model lies with the addition of the brand's latest Touch Pro Duo infotainment system which features a pair of high-definition 10-inch touchscreens that form the centrepiece of the minimalist cabin. Otherwise, things are much as before. As ever, we particularly like the way that the car's air suspension system automatically drops to its lowest 'Access Height' when parked to make entry and exit easier.This car's substantial size isn't enough to permit the fitment of the couple of occasional rear boot-mounted seats you'll find in a Land Rover Discovery or (optionally) in a Range Rover Sport. Still, buyers of this top Range Rover model have never seemed to want them. Luggage room has always been a greater priority, so I should point out that there's 505-litres of it - which may be a little less than you were expecting. Perhaps that has something to do with the greater priority that Land Rover's designers have given to space for rear seat passengers.

So many cars claim to be unique but the Range Rover really is, continuing to set the standard in the super-luxury SUV sector. This improved MK4 model gets the option of petrol/electric Plug-in hybrid power - and offers mild hybrid diesel power for the first time. And all variants get a luxurious cabin with an intuitive 'Touch Pro Duo' infotainment system. Otherwise, things are much as they've always been with a Range Rover, this aluminium-bodied luxury SUV good enough to properly combine the imperious qualities of a top luxury saloon with off piste abilities that would be limited only by the skills of its driver. Off road, there's a full time 'intelligent 4WD system' with a two-speed transfer 'box plus the option of Land Rover's very clever All-Terrain Progress Control system. A Rolls Royce in the rough, there's nothing quite like it. And in summary? Well drive this Range Rover through a river, drive it to the opera: it's as happy either way, beautifully built, gorgeously finished and astonishingly quick. Makes you proud to be British doesn't it.
Monthly Payments of £
£1161.83 Av. Monthly Cost (Including Initial Payment)
Initial Payment: £8914.53 Inc VAT ( months upfront)
Document Fee: £300.00 (Charged by the leasing company)
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