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MINI CONVERTIBLE 2.0 John Cooper Works II 2dr
MINI CONVERTIBLE 2.0 John Cooper Works II 2dr
MINI CONVERTIBLE 2.0 John Cooper Works II 2dr
MINI CONVERTIBLE 2.0 John Cooper Works II 2dr
MINI CONVERTIBLE 2.0 John Cooper Works II 2dr
MINI CONVERTIBLE 2.0 John Cooper Works II 2dr
MINI CONVERTIBLE 2.0 John Cooper Works II 2dr
MINI CONVERTIBLE 2.0 John Cooper Works II 2dr

67212451 369.80 299
£2218.83 Inc VAT (6 Months Upfront) | 48 Month Contract | 8000 k Miles P/A

MINI CONVERTIBLE
2.0 John Cooper Works II 2dr

Convertible | 2 Doors | Petrol | Manual

£369.80

Per Month Inc VAT
Initial Payment
£2218.83 (6 Months Upfront)
Contract Length: 48 Months
Annual Mileage: 8000
Document Fee: £299.00
Average Monthly Cost: £415.30

Customise your lease


Genus Leasing
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Price History

Rating Breakdown

Performance
8
10
Handling
8
10
Comfort
7
10
Space
6
10
Style
6
10
Build
8
10
Value
6
10
Equipment
7
10
Economy
8
10
Depreciation
8
10
Insurance
7
10
Total
72
100

Technical Specs, Equipment & Colours

Vehicle Review

It's pretty hard to take exception to MINI's MK3 model Convertible. It delivers surprising space for passengers and luggage, a stylish roadway demeanour and a customisable fabric roof. This current version has been usefully updated in recent years with fresh technology, smart connectivity, standard-fit front and rear LED lights across the range, plus an advanced dual-clutch automatic gearbox. As before, buyers can pick three cylinder, four cylinder and JCW performance versions.

When BMW re-booted the MINI brand in 2001, it took three years to add a convertible to the range. Once on sale, four people could enjoy the open-air adventures MINI promised, although the rear passengers had a tight squeeze getting into the back. Things were improved in the second generation version we saw in 2009, but the space was still very limited. Still, this drop-top model sold well, stealing sales not only from small cabriolets aimed at Kings Road cruising, but also grabbing a few from more focused open-topped sportscars. This third generation convertible model, launched in 2016, grew in every dimension and MINI managed to do this without ruining this car's charm. Plus there are some innovative options over and above some high-tech standard equipment.

The Convertible MINI has a slightly different remit from the hatchback - being all about style - but the fact that it invokes the Cooper name across all variants hints at the potential for driving thrills. The base 136hp MINI Cooper Convertible will accelerate from 0-62mph in 8.8 seconds and hit 129mph. There's also a pokier 192hp Cooper S petrol version and a flagship 231hp John Cooper Works derivative. High performance though, hardly seems relevant in a four seat soft-top: what is important is the operation of the newly-designed roof. At speeds of up to 18mph, this fabric top can be lowered or raised in 18 seconds, so when the British weather does what it does, you'll not be left out in the rain for too long. If you just want to open the small portion over the front seats, it can slide back 40cm, automatically, at any speed. In the current range we're looking at here, nothing's fundamentally changed engine-wise, though MINI says that minor changes have been made in recent years to its TwinPower Turbo Technology across the board, improving engine electronics, oil supply, intake air ducting, the cooling set-up and the exhaust system. Perhaps most significant though is the news that the brand has at last got around to fitting in a proper dual-clutch auto gearbox for those wanting a self-shifter, this now a 7-speed unit.

The styling of this revised MK3 model doesn't look all that different, but close inspection will reveal the addition of standard-fit LED front and rear lights, plus there's now extra scope for all-important personalisation. Otherwise, this third generation MINI Cooper Convertible retains the basic overall body shape that we all know and love, with each of its key dimensions just a little larger than those of its earlier pre-2016 MK2 model predecessor. This addresses the main criticisms of the older design in two key areas: the back seats and the boot. Rear passengers get more legroom, making access the second row easier. When the folded fabric roof is down, it forms a wrap-around collar around the back seats, rather than disappearing completely. It encroaches slightly into the boot area but despite this, the luggage capacity is these days a reasonably acceptable 215-litres with the roof closed and 160-litres with it folded down. The roof is customisable and retracts in 18 seconds. Optional is a woven Union Flag option. The rival DS 3 Cabriolet model can also be specified with a patterned roof, but the Union Flag has long been associated with the MINI. There's also a new MINI logo that appears on the bonnet, tailgate, steering wheel, instrument display and central locking remote control.

Three years after the introduction of the hardtop version of the MINI came the Convertible, a vehicle that once again rocketed the Cowley-built but Munich-bankrolled car onto the must-haves list. Two versions were on offer from the outset; the entry-level 90bhp MINI One Convertible and the sporty 116bhp Cooper Convertible. A few months later, MINI surprised everybody by launching the supercharged 170bhp Cooper S drop top. Demand was strong, although, as with any model that is a fashion item, demand can drop off as quickly as it ramps up and with newer rivals now rivalling the MINI Convertible in terms of high street chic, now could be a good time to pick up a cut price used bargain.

The roof itself is a fully automatic fabric affair, MINI wisely choosing to reject the far more complex folding hard top fashion. Opting for this more complex engineering solution would not only have ruined the MINI's shape but also severely impinged on its luggage space. As it stands, the MINI retains a characteristic profile with the roof in place yet looks appealingly cheeky with the hood down. Press a button once and the roof slides back by 40cm, creating a sunroof effect. Press it again and the hood retracts fully, folding down behind the rear seats. It's not the neatest stowing arrangement but it only takes 15 seconds to get there and you'll retain a healthy 120 litres of storage space in the boot. The boot itself is worth taking a look at and it's not often I find myself saying that in a road test. It's redolent of the original Mini insofar as it has a drop down lid which can double as a loading platform. A pair of steel cables mounted on a sprung retractor act as boot hinges and can hold up to 80kg which, in old money, is nigh on 13 stone. With the roof in place - i.e. up - there's 165 litres of stowage space but those wishing to transport bulkier items are also accommodated. By flicking a pair of levers located in the boot, the rear fastening of the roof can be detached, allowing the entire rear section to be raised. This in turn creates a wider space through which bigger items can be loaded. Couple that with the folding rear seats and you'll be able to jemmy-in some surprisingly loads. MINI claim a total capacity of 605 litres.

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A clutch assembly is around £130. Front brake pads are around £40, a full exhaust about £360, an alternator around £100 and a tyre around £40. A starter motor is about £120. A headlamp is about £165.

It's pretty hard to take exception to MINI's MK3 model Convertible. It delivers surprising space for passengers and luggage, a stylish roadway demeanour and a customisable fabric roof. This current version has been usefully updated in recent years with fresh technology, smart connectivity, standard-fit front and rear LED lights across the range, plus an advanced dual-clutch automatic gearbox. As before, buyers can pick three cylinder, four cylinder and JCW performance versions. The styling of this revised MK3 model doesn't look all that different, but close inspection will reveal the addition of standard-fit LED front and rear lights, plus there's now extra scope for all-important personalisation. When the folded fabric roof is down, it forms a wrap-around collar around the back seats, rather than disappearing completely. It encroaches slightly into the boot area but despite this, the luggage capacity is these days a reasonably acceptable 215-litres with the roof closed and 160-litres with it folded down. The roof is customisable and retracts in 18 seconds.
Monthly Payments of £
£415.30 Av. Monthly Cost (Including Initial Payment)
Initial Payment: £2218.83 Inc VAT ( months upfront)
Document Fee: £299.00 (Charged by the leasing company)
Genus Leasing